Features

“I believe on the film as a poetic medium. I don’t think it competes with painting, or ballet – the visual side of films is a key to poetry … The danger in the cinema is that you see everything, because it’s a camera. So what you have to do is to manage to evoke, to raise up things which are not really there.” Orson Welles, 1964

How I Live Now How I Live Now

How I Live Now

Director: Kevin Mac Donald
Production: Cowboy Films/Film 4 London
Format: Alexa M/Alexa Plus/Canon C300/S35mm colour

“… it's quite a dark, little film. It was designed, financially, to be with no name actors at all. Saoirse Ronan so wanted to do it and I met her, she was so fantastic, and so right in age. Everybody else in this will be unknown, never having acted before. It's all kids.”
Kevin Mac Donald, 2012

Palermo Shooting Palermo Shooting

Palermo Shooting

Director: Wim Wenders
Production: Neue Road Movies, Berlin
Format: S-35mm/S-16mm

“For the 3rd time Franz Lustig is the eye of Wenders. Again he captures terrific images, shot on 35mm in Düsseldorf and S-16 handheld camera in Palermo.”
Dieter Oßwald, 2008

Don’t Come Knocking Don’t Come Knocking

Don’t Come Knocking

Director: Wim Wenders
Production: Reverse Angle, Berlin
Format: 35mm anamorphic cinemascope
Award: European Film Award Best Cinematographer 2005

“Lustig’s widescreen vistas possess masterly depth and clarity, but his most affecting contributions are tableaus of Butte, the clean geometry pulsing with the longings of Edward Hopper’s lone souls.”
Boxoffice Magazine, May 2005

Land of Plenty Land of Plenty

Land of Plenty

Director: Wim Wenders
Production: Reverse Angle Berlin, InDigEnt New York
Format: DV 25p
Award: Nominated for Best Camera German Film Award 2005

“Richly colored lensing, beautifully corrected and executed entirely with handheld digital cameras by newcomer Franz Lustig, also impresses, creating a flattened effect that gives the pic a jaunty, comicbook quality.”
Variety, Sep 14, 2004

“A film is never really good unless the camera is an eye in the head of a poet.” Orson Welles